Welcome to The Hao Xu Group
Selective Catalysis • Complex-Molecule Synthesis • Functional Chemical Synthesis

Department of Chemistry
Georgia State University

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Welcome! We are a group of scientists who are interested in novel chemical reactivity and selectivity, especially in catalytic processes. We are engaged in two dynamic areas of chemical synthesis: complex-molecule synthesis and functional synthesis at the chemistry–biology interface.

Complex-molecule synthesis has had tremendous impact on the development of chemistry, biology and medicine. However, it is a misconception that chemical synthesis is a mature discipline. Lengthy synthetic sequences and low overall yields in most multi-step syntheses make it extremely challenging to provide sufficient quantities of desired targets for therapeutic purposes. The inefficiency is often due to the limited availability of chiral building blocks and our limited capability to control selectivity. The discovery of powerful selective catalytic reactions will significantly increase the efficiency of complex-molecule synthesis.  The long-term goal of our research program is to design and discover selective catalytic reactions for efficient complex-molecule synthesis, and to supply sufficient quantities of targets for biological studies. Further mechanistic study and synthetic application of these reactions will allow for rapid syntheses of various complex targets.

Selective labeling of bio-macromolecules (proteins in particular) in living cells offers chemists and biologists new opportunities to investigate biological phenomena at the molecular, cellular or organismal level. Chemical labeling with small-molecule probes, a complementary approach to classic enzymatic labeling methods, has emerged as a unique tool for biologists. The long term goal of this research program is to design and discover robust ligation reactions under physiological conditions, and to apply them to selectively label various bio-macromolecules in vivo.

Copyright 2012 © The Hao Xu Group, Georgia State University